a brilliant match of material and theater
— Jesse Green, The New York Times

There are scenes in New Saloon’s lightning-fast, kitten-fanged comedy that are an unalloyed joy:
the zippiest, zingiest salvos I’ve seen come out of what we might call the Millennial Camp movement. The small collective—playwright Milo Cramer, director Morgan Green and actor Madeline Wise—is working in a rich and productive comic vein.
— Helen Shaw, Time Out New York

It’s hard to understate the joy of seeing a show — of seeing this show — at the Bushwick Starr, theater’s answer to the rock club where you caught your favorite band before it got big. [...] It surely won’t be the last we’ve heard from New Saloon.
— Elisabeth Vincentelli, The Village Voice

New Saloon’s MINOR CHARACTER is a vivacious and brilliant work of theatre. It embodies the very essence, heart, and feelings of Chekhov: comedy, pathos, cross-purposes, understanding-and-misunderstanding punctuated by eruptions of anger, moments of pathos, and the Chekhovian tension between despair and hope.
— Richard Schechner

They have taken a canonical work and have managed to stretch its imaginary spaces, making it instantly important and relevant, pushing the boundaries of adaption and translation work of plays to new height. The bar is set high now. Good luck climbing over it.
— Kristine Haruna Lee, Culturebot

 
Created by New Saloon, the creative dynamo comprising Milo Cramer, Morgan Green and Madeline Wise, MINOR CHARACTER is the experimental theatre all experimental theatre wants to be: wackily conceived, rigorously executed, and an exhilarating punch in the gut.
— Seth Simons, Exeunt Magazine

 
...The delightful MINOR CHARACTER, in which experimental ensemble New Saloon peppers Chekhov’s tragicomedy with postmodern strategies [...] turn[s] a play that has been an autumnal meditation on aging into a spring-green forum on youth’s discontents.
— Helen Shaw, the Village Voice

...an elegiac 2016 production, a fugue of simultaneous English renderings transposed into a millennial key, whose melancholy
resonated against the worn wood and oxidized steel of the former factory.
— David Bruin, The New York City Performance Space-Time Continuum, Duke University Press
 

hysterical, inventive and brilliant
— Ryan Hudak, New York Theatre Review

 
If New Saloon’s wildly playful MINOR CHARACTER teaches you anything about making theatre, perhaps it is this: Once you make your concept, it might be best to break it. [...] Treating the concept [of performing multiple translations simultaneously] like a matchbook and a can of kerosene, New Saloon light a fire that becomes a raging conflagration.
— Gavin Whitehead, TDF

 
I left Invisible Dog that day in a state of euphoria because what had happened was unlike anything I had ever seen in the theatre.
— Ariel Stess, The Brooklyn Rail